Glen Cove High School Celebrates Hispanic Heritage

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In recognition of Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15-Oct. 15), students at Glen Cove High School have been immersed in a multitude of interesting and creative projects.

Herenia Padilla’s Spanish Native Language Arts I students culminated their studies of Spanish-speaking countries by discussing their research projects in small groups. A large number of the projects included illustrations and artifacts from many of the 21 Spanish-speaking countries. Ms. Padilla purposely assigned students specific countries that were not their native regions so they would learn about new and different cultures and traditions.
    
Ms. Padilla’s Spanish Native Language Arts II classes have been studying early indigenous groups and the contributions they have made in numerous facets, including organized structures similar to present-day government. They also studied Latino leaders in New York and their impact in the community. Her AP Spanish Language and Culture class has been studying a unit on water and discussing its scarcity, floods, natural disasters and the implications of the water wars in Bolivia. The students will further analyze the situation in Bolivia to see how the country’s leaders handle the “water war.” As future leaders, the students will be asked to develop peaceful ways to solve or alleviate the water problem.
    
Hispanic heritage was also explored in the arts classes at GCHS. Vicki Gordon’s Ceramic Arts classes have been working on a project to celebrate the Day of the Dead, a national Mexican holiday observed Nov. 1-2 that focuses on praying for and remembering loved ones who have died. Traditions include honoring the deceased using skulls and donning skull masks. Melissa Johnides’ Studio Art class also sketched and painted colorful skull masks to honor the holiday.

All Spanish language classes received information on the origins of Hispanic Heritage Month. Discussions have been ongoing about the importance of the month and how students can promote a more positive view of the Latino community.